Hi there it's, Alexandra from the Middlesized Garden, YouTube channel and blog, and today we're, going to talk about how to choose and position, sculpture and ornaments in your garden. Garden, sculpture and ornaments can lift your garden in a way That almost nothing else can they provide structure and ornamentation.

In the summer, when there's, lots else going on and in the winter they're. Often the only thing that you & # 39, ll, see., Garden, sculpture and ornaments can add, focus to a small garden and punctuation points to a larger garden, and I've, seen some fantastic examples in the past few years.

So I'm, going to show you them here to help you decide what sort of sculpture and garden ornaments would work in your garden.. Of course, garden sculpture can be very expensive, but garden ornaments are much more affordable and there's.

A fairly muddled line between the two., You can also buy second hand in junk shops or online in auctions, and you can adapt something yourself.. When a car crashed into the fence of a friend of mine, she thought that the tangled metal looked like a sculpture, so she painted it and she put it in her garden.

And now you can see it that's at Doddington, Place, Gardens and when I mention gardens to visit or where I've got names of the sculptors or the shops where the sculpture can be found. I'll. Put all that in the links in the description below ( with time stamps ) On to the tips for choosing and placing sculpture and garden ornaments.

. The most important use of sculpture is as a focal point in a garden.. For example, this fine stainless steel sculpture draws attention to a part of the garden that would probably just be overlooked if it wasn't there, and I think the thing to notice here is that it is such a good contrast.

. It's, stainless steel, it's bright. It's straight ( sort of ). It's; airy it's. Transparent. Around it. There's. Texture there's movement. There are quite solid shapes with these quite dark trees and then there's, the fields beyond so it's, a real standout piece.

. It is contrast and focal point that's. What makes this particular sculpture work.. Another thing you can do is to frame your focal point with your planting. Here there are three or four trees which make a very small orchard, and in the middle, is a modern sculpture and that's, framed by the trees and it's a focal point.

And once again you're. Looking at contrast here, the the owner of this garden could have chosen something more naturalistic, but in fact they decided to go for modern sculpture. The choice is yours., And here there's, more contrast in a small courtyard garden in the garden belonging to garden designer Mark Lane, and there's, a video with more of his garden in the description below.

. Here you've got something that's very chunky, very dark, very solid, very angular, very abstract, and the planting is soft and pretty and light so that's. Another use of sculpture and contrast., And this mirrored obelisk at Doddington Place Gardens, is a particularly interesting focal point because the mirror glass makes it look as if it's, hardly there.

It reflects the different seasons and it reflects the skies and actually it's, a lovely use of mirror in a garden because it's. Very slim. People worry about putting mirror glass in a garden in case birds fly into it, but in fact a bird flying towards this would very soon see itself in the glass and would be able to swerve away.

. This seated praying sculpture is a focal point for a seating area, but it also brings up another important question which is & # 39. What your sculpture or garden ornaments look like from your house'Inside this house.

There's, a long corridor with a big glass window and, as you walk down it, you can see this sculpture getting closer and closer. So that is an important point to think about what does your garden, sculpture or ornamentation look like from the house? The classic advice, obviously is & # 39.

Don't have too large a sculpture in too small a garden & # 39, but all rules were made to be broken as they are in. These two show gardens at BBC Gardeners World Live, but if you look at the two gardens you can see why it works.

In this garden, the sculpture, is very transparent. It's very angular, you can see through it. You can talk through it and it's in the middle of the garden, but it doesn't occupy a lot of visual space.

. The other sculpture is at the back of the garden and it's very solid and it's circular. And if you put that one in the middle of a small garden, you would actually block people's view, and it would be very difficult to see around it and it would look cluttered.

So if you just think about those two works, they're, both large and they're, both in very small spaces, but I think they both look great.. So what about using sculpture and garden ornaments as punctuation points having something defined and structural in a flower border in summer, when there's, so much movement and color, and everything going on when it really helps just to anchor the planting and in winter Of course, it gives you something to look at, for example, this classical bust really shows off the beautiful roses behind it in summer, whereas in winter it's, the main thing to look at.

, These simple wrought iron supports contrast beautifully with the flowers and They act as supports because I tie the plants to them. I particularly love this one with the hydrangeas. It looks so great against the blowsiness of the flower.

And this rotating sculpture, which moves with the wind, really looks fantastic in both summer and winter. It's actually placed in an area which has some quite chunky shrubs. So once again, it offers some contrast and some movement.

In the winter, when you & # 39, ve got the evergreen shrubs, which are quite chunky. It offers the kind of movement that you would normally get with flowers in the summer and it looks just beautiful in all seasons.

When you're choosing materials for your garden, sculpture or your ornaments think about whether you prefer contrast or harmony.. For example. This David Harber sculpture, in a show garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show, is a complete contrast to the planting around it.

You've got the softness and the movement of the planting, and you & # 39. Ve got this very clear: sculptural architectural silver statue.. On the other hand, these copper sculptures by sculptor, Emily Stone actually blend into their surroundings and they're much more natural.

So it's, really just a question of what you prefer.. If you & # 39, ve got old, brick or stone walls, then you might want an old stone. Sculpture, like this pineapple in a small courtyard at Parham House, Gardens or you can echo modern materials like this sculpture by Sanae Maelstrom in a house designed by the modernist architect.

Guilford Bell in Australia., Echoing your surroundings, generally, can create a theme for your sculpture or garden ornaments. Several gardens I've. Seen have had bird themes such as this one in Jonny and Dale's garden in Australia, which you can see more of in my Garden Inspirations video, which I'll, put in the description below.

They've got two Cranes fighting in a little glade, they've, got a little procession of chickens or chooks, as you would call them in Australia tottering along a path. There are little painted hens pecking away in a corner, and there are bird sculptures elsewhere.

. If you want to echo your surroundings with sculpture in a country garden, you might think about having geese or hair or rabbits or even a horse.. This beautiful sea bird overlooks a marina and the kentish marshes and it's, absolutely right for its environment, and these two modern, chooks or chickens are pecking around the vegetable garden of horticulturalist and broadcaster, Stephen Ryan.

In Australia.. You can add color to your garden with garden, ornaments and sculpture, and the most outstanding example I've. Seen of this is the amazing exhibition at Kew, Gardens of Chihuly, and not many of us could afford a Chihuly in our garden, but I think it's really worth seeing how they look in places like Kew Gardens just to inspire you.

, And you Can use color in a much smaller way, such as with this little courtyard garden, which has got a sculpture by Peter Cole in it, and these copper seed heads add a bit of color in a garden. Here in the Greenfingers show garden designed by Kate Gould at Rhs chelsea she's, put in a huge green apple.

It's rather as a focal point, but it also offers a contrast to the planting., and even these painted bicycles at RHS. Hampton Court Palace Garden Festival just show you what you can do by painting something and just putting it in your garden as an ornamentation.

. Probably the most happy partnership between garden, sculpture and ornaments is with ponds and water features.. If you & # 39, ve got a pond or water feature. You've, got an opportunity for garden, sculpture or an ornament.

You can go naturalistic like with this very beautiful, classical statue of a girl by a pond. And obviously a bird by water is always going to be naturalistic or you can go abstract, such as this water sculpture at Kew, Gardens or try.

Something really modern, like this sculpture, fountain at Borde Hill Gardens in Sussex., Borde Hill gardens have a lot of wonderful sculpture, so I can really recommend going there if you want to get your eye in for garden sculpture.

. So what about affording garden, sculpture and ornaments? I bought this concrete Greek statue very cheaply at an auction by putting a silly bid in and being very surprised when I got it and we also have two stone dogs which we have on either side of our steps, which we got from a junk shop.

So second hand can really work. And you can adapt things yourself. This sculpture looks like a piece of modern art, but it's, actually just five corten steel panels, which were ordered and cut by a friend of mine who placed them like this.

So they only cost him the cost of the corten steel panels and those are very affordable. And here at Doddington Place Gardens when they cut down a tree instead of disposing of the trunk. They did some little carvings to make it look like a sculpture.

, And another friend of mine has used second-hand shop mannequins as sculpture in her garden.. Probably the best thing you can do if you want to adapt something to use as a garden, ornament or sculpture.

In your garden is to go and visit other gardens that have sculpture in it.. If you put'sculpture garden near me'into Google, you will be amazed by what comes up., Placing sculpture and garden ornaments in your garden is very much part of garden design.

So if you're interested in giving your garden a lift there's, a playlist at the end of this video called Best Garden Design, videos which I can really recommend, and if you'd, like more tips, ideas and Inspiration for your garden then do subscribe to the Middlesized Garden YouTube channel and thank you for watching Goodbye hi there.

It's, alexandra from the middlesized garden, youtube channel and blog, and today we're, going to talk about how to choose and position, sculpture and ornaments in your garden, garden, sculpture and ornaments can lift your garden in a way that almost Nothing else can they provide structure and ornamentation in the summer, when there's, lots else going on and in the winter they're.

Often the only thing that you'll, see garden, sculpture and ornaments can add, focus to a small garden and punctuation points to a larger garden, and i've, seen some fantastic examples in the past few years.

So i'm, going to show you them here so that you can decide what sort of sculpture and garden ornaments would work in your garden. Of course, garden sculpture can be very expensive, but garden ornaments are much more affordable and there's, a fairly muddled line between the two.

You can also buy second hand in junk shops or online in auctions, and you can adapt something yourself. When a car crashed into the fence of a friend of mine, she thought that the tangled metal looked like a sculpture, so she painted it and she put it in her garden.

And now you can see it that's at doddington, place, gardens and when i mention gardens to visit or where i've got names of the sculptors or the shops where the sculpture can be. I'll. Put all that in the links in the description below, but on to the tips for choosing and placing sculpture and garden ornaments.

The most important use of sculpture is as a focal point in a garden. For example, this fine stainless steel sculpture draws attention to a part of the garden that will probably just be overlooked if it wasn't there, and i think the thing to notice here is that it has such good contrast.

It's. Stainless steel, it's bright. It's straight it's. Airy it's transparent around it. There's. Texture there's movement. They're. Quite solid shapes of these quite dark trees, and then there's, the fields beyond so it's, a real standout piece.

It just is contrast and focal point is what makes this particular sculpture. Another thing you can do is to frame your focal point with your planting. Here there are three or four trees which make a very small orchard and in the middle, is a modern sculpture and that's framed by the trees and it's a focal point, and once again, you're.

Looking at contrast here, the the owner of this garden could have chosen something more naturalist, but in fact they decided to go for modern sculpture. The choice is yours, and here there's, more contrast in a small courtyard garden in the garden belonging to garden designer mark lane, and there's, a video with more of his garden in the description below here you'Ve got something that's very chunky, very dark, very solid, very angular, very abstract, and the planting is soft and pretty and light so that's.

Another use of sculpture and contrast - and this mirrored obelisk at doddington place gardens, is a particularly interesting focal point because the mirror glass makes it look as if it's, hardly there.

It reflects the different seasons and it reflects the skies and actually it's, a lovely use of mirror in a garden because it's. Very slim. People worry about putting mirror glass in a garden in case birds fly into it, but in fact a bird flying towards this would very soon see itself in the glass and would be able to swerve away.

This seated praying sculpture is a focal point for a seating area, but it also brings up another important question, which is what your sculpture or garden ornaments look like from your house inside this house.

There's, a long corridor with a big glass window and, as you walk down it, you can see this sculpture getting closer and closer. So that is an important point to think about what does your garden, sculpture or ornamentation look like from the house? The classic advice, obviously is don't have too large a sculpture in too small a garden, but all rules were made to be broken as they are in these two show gardens at bbc gardeners world live.

But if you look at the two gardens you can see why it works in this garden. The sculpture is very transparent. It's very angular, you can see through it, you can talk through it and it's in the middle of the garden, but it doesn't occupy a lot of visual space.

The other sculpture is at the back of the garden and it's very solid and it's circular. And if you put that one in the middle of a small garden, you would actually block people's view, and it would be very difficult to see around it and it would look cluttered.

So if you just think about those two statues, they're, both large and they're, both in very small spaces. But i think they both look great. So what about using sculpture and garden ornaments as punctuation points having something defined and structural in a flower border in summer, when there's, so much movement and color and everything going on, and it really helps just to anchor the planting and in winter Of course, it gives you something to look at, for example, this classical bust really shows off the beautiful roses behind it in summer, whereas in winter it's.

The main thing to look at these simple wrought iron supports contrast beautifully with the flowers and they act as supports, because i tie the flowers to them. I particularly love this one with the hydrangeas.

It looks so great against the blousiness of the flower and this rotating sculpture, which moves with the wind, really looks fantastic in both summer and winter. It's actually placed in an area which has some quite chunky shrubs.

So once again, it offers some contrast and some movement in the winter, when you & # 39, ve got the evergreen shrubs, which are quite chunky there. It offers the kind of movement that you would normally get with flowers in the summer and it looks just beautiful in all seasons when you're choosing materials for your garden, sculpture or your ornaments think about whether you prefer contrast or harmony.

For example. This david harbour, sculpture in a show garden at rhs chelsea, is a complete contrast to the planting around it. You & # 39, ve got the softness and the movement of the planting, and you & # 39.

Ve got this very clear: sculptural architectural silver statue, but these copper sculptures by sculptor, emily stone actually blend into their surroundings and they're much more natural. So it's, really just a question of what you prefer.

If you & # 39, ve got old, brick or stone walls, then you might want an old stone. Sculpture, like this pineapple in a small courtyard at parham house, gardens or you can echo modern materials like this sculpture by sanayo maelstrom in a house designed by the modernist architect, guilford bell in australia, echoing your surroundings generally, can create a theme for your sculpture or garden Ornaments several gardens i've, seen have had bird themes such as this one in johnny and dale's garden in australia, which you can see more of in my garden inspirations video, which i'll, put in the description Below they & # 39, ve got two cranes fighting in a little glade.

They've, got a little procession of chickens or chucks, as you would call them in australia tottering along a path. There are little painted hens pecking away in a corner and there are bird sculptures elsewhere.

If you want to echo your surroundings with sculpture in a country garden, you might think about having geese or hair or rabbits or even a horse. This beautiful sea bird overlooks a marina and the kentish marshes and it's, absolutely right for its environment, and these two modern, chucks or chickens are pecking around the vegetable garden of horticulturalist and broadcaster, stephen ryan in australia.

You can add color to your garden with garden, ornaments and sculpture, and the most outstanding example i've. Seen of this is the amazing exhibition at kew, gardens of chihuly, and not many of us could afford a chihuly in our garden, but i think it's really worth seeing how it looks at kew gardens just to inspire you and you can use Color in a much smaller way, such as with this little courtyard garden, which has got a sculpture by peter cole in it, and these copper seed heads, add a bit of color in a garden here in the green fingers, show garden designed by kate gould at rhs.

Chelsea she's, put in a huge green apple. It's rather as a focal point, but it also offers a contrast to the planting, and even these painted bicycles at rhs, hampton court palace garden show just show you what you can do by painting something and just putting it in your garden as An ornamentation, probably the most happy partnership between garden, sculpture and ornaments is with ponds and water features.

If you & # 39, ve got a pond or water feature. You & # 39. Ve, got an opportunity for garden, sculpture or an ornament. You can go naturalistic like with this very beautiful, classical statue of a girl by a pond, and obviously a bird by water is always going to be naturalistic or you can go abstract, such as this water sculpture at kew, gardens or try.

Something really modern, like this sculpture, fountain at board hill gardens in sussex board hill gardens have a lot of wonderful sculpture, so i can really recommend going there if you want to get your eye in for garden sculpture.

So what about affording garden, sculpture and ornaments? I bought this concrete greek statue very cheaply at an auction by putting a silly bid in and being very surprised when i got it and we also have two stone dogs which we have on either side of our steps, which we got from a junk shop.

So second hand can really work and you can adapt things yourself. This sculpture looks like a piece of modern art, but it's, actually just five corton steel panels, which were ordered and cut by a friend of mine who placed them like this.

So they only cost him the cost of the court and steel panels and those are very affordable and here at doddington place gardens when they cut down a tree instead of disposing of the trunk, they did some little carvings to make it look like a sculpture and Another friend of mine has used second-hand shop mannequins as sculpture in her garden.

Probably the best thing you can do if you want to adapt something to use as a garden, ornament or sculpture in your garden is to go and visit other gardens that have sculpture in it. If you put sculpture garden near me into google, you will be amazed by what comes up placing sculpture and garden ornaments in your garden is very much part of garden design.

So if you're interested in giving your garden a lift there's, a playlist at the end of this video called best garden design, videos which i can really recommend, and if you'd, like more tips, ideas and Inspiration for your garden then do subscribe to the middlesized garden youtube channel and thank you for watching goodbye.

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