Would you like people to come into your garden and go'wow'when they see your borders, And do you think that herbaceous borders like these belong in grand country houses where there are teams of professional gardeners and a big budget for Plants, This is Paul and Frances Moskovits's garden and it's 125 feet long by 65, feet wide that's about 38 by 19 meters and Frances propagates most of the plants or grows them from seed herself, and She's, going to share her tips with us on how to get this kind of border.

That has an amazing wow factor.. This isn't a low maintenance border, it's, a wow factor border and it's really important to recognize the difference between the two. Frances doesn't have any horticultural qualifications and the things that she Does to look after this border aren't difficult, but she does spend time and effort both thinking about it and doing things.

. I also talk quite often about finding your own gardening style, and this is a particular kind of gardening style, because if you love your garden and you love gardening, then giving a border extra care and attention so that you could have a real wow factor is often Very worthwhile.

I don't think i could ever achieve the levels of perfection seen in this border. But actually, i've learned a lot from Frances's tips and I hope you will too.. She and Paul run the local garden club, which is called the Painters, Forstall Gardening club, and they also open their garden twice a year for the National Garden Scheme and they visit other gardens, and I'll, put links for all those in the description.

Below. So Frances, how have you created this border? Well, it's been years of sort of getting things together in my head, and I really wanted a beautiful mixed border. So it literally has taken years of practice with lots of propagation trying out different plants and probably, most importantly, getting a lot of inspiration from other gardens.

My main inspiration has been Great Dixter.. I absolutely love it and when we get chance we we will try and nip along there once or twice a year and then we come home and we're just inspired. So that really has been the inspiration and for the last two or three years, maybe three or four years.

Actually, we've sort of had the border more or less as we like it.. It takes a lot of time, a lot of patience and a lot of manure That's, the most important thing, compost of all types, so a nice mix of compost, a lovely range of plants, and I love to mix the herbaceous perennials.

. It's, actually quite easy now, because the herbaceous perennials obviously die away and then magically reappear, usually just after the spring bulbs, because we have a few spring bulbs in in the border.

And then we clear away all the detritus that's, no longer really going to help the border and start to think about how the perennials are coming along.. Then I usually have done plenty of propagating.

I start to propagate things now for next year and then lots of sowing of seeds, annuals, biennials, obviously and then mix in whatever I've got into the border and usually plenty of it.. For me, the secret is to put plenty of plants in the border, so there's.

No weeding.. Could you just run through how you do the compost? We get a mix of compost.. We have a friendly farmer where we get some really lovely old, well-rotted cow manure - from an old cow yard which takes a bit of work because it's out on the marsh.

And we have to drive out there and take all our bags. And we fill it up and do several trips. And we buy organic horse manure that's, usually been steam treated, so there are a few weeds in it and then mushroom compost and any old pots of compost go on there.

So that will help to keep the moisture in in the summer.. Basically, we add anything we can get our hands on and plenty of it.. So how much compost do you put on the borders, A foot or even two feet thick literally? So if i get a bag, a very very heavy bag of our own collected compost, ( also, we have our own compost heap here and mix that in ).

If we get a bag of really well rotted steam treated horse, compost or anything like that, then one of those heavy really heavy bags will go on just one phlox plant and I don't, spread it out. It goes on in a lump on top of it before it starts to come through the ground in the autumn.

I'll, try and add compost as well as in the spring. During the winter. The birds will actually flatten it out. Take all the bits out enjoy themselves on the food, and the worms will do the rest., And the thing is, there are great big lumps of compost, probably in there still, but you can't see them because it's actually covered In plants, so I think the thing to do is to be really heavy-handed with any organic material that you can get for the garden-, any type of compost that suits your garden, and with this one we have a mix.

Because that way, I'm covering all bases and plenty of it. Don't skimp. Don't think you have to put an inch or a six inch layer on layer on even a foot. If you can two feet, if you can get two two feet of compost on there, shovel it on and the other thing is we don't, do any digging.

We can't, possibly even begin to dig there.. We wouldn't dig this bed, we have a sort of no dig technique and we've just had to do it because you can't find any space in there to dig so the worms do the digging for Us.

, If you put enough compost on it's, really lovely, very well rotted. You can even buy organic compost in bags. If you haven & # 39, t got your own compost heap.. If you can get anything put it on and don't spread it out, don't be alarmed, and then during the winter the bugs will be doing the work for you.

In autumn. I put plenty of compost on really loading. It up and again in the spring, and the thing is that very possibly by the time you get to the spring, you're, not quite sure, because the compost would have been probably morphed into the soil.

Sometimes you're, not quite sure where you & # 39. Ve put it literally, but don & # 39. T worry about that. Just put more on That's the secret, And how do you plant up the borders? I would say always try and put more than one of your plants in together.

For instance, this year we've had bergamot ( Monarda ), which has been in the border now for about two or three years, and I'm. Never too sure whether or not it's going to come through the winter. I mean it always has, but some people say it's, a short-lived plant.

. It hasn't been short lived here, yet touch wood. So I always try and do plenty of cuttings just in case and then in the spring late spring I will plant two or three more plants near to the bergamot that i'm.

Hoping is going to pop up. So in fact, you end up with lots. This year we & # 39, ve ended up with quite a bit and I love that.. So I would say make sure you put plenty of of plants in If you have verbascums put a couple fairly close to each other.

You know the perennial verbascums can get quite grand, but don't. Put that put you off because they flower forever and you can deadhead them and they keep flowering.. So you don't space plants out the way they advise on the labels.

If it says, needs to be 12 inches apart. You wouldn't necessarily take any notice of that. No, I don't have the spaces that they say on labels. I just make my own labels up, and i just put in whatever I can, wherever I can and don't be frightened because you can always cut them back if they start to get a little bit thuggish.

. You know they're. Still going to be beautiful, but if they get too big, they may not be taking over the garden, but they may unbalance the border in the colour scheme. So then, you can always just chop them down a bit, then the other things will grow over them and then they & # 39.

Ll, come up later on a bit like a Chelsea chop, but not quite a Chelsea chop. You can sort of play with the border. It's a bit like a musical instrument. You can actually play with it and, and it moves a very easy way of getting lots of color in the garden, is to put lots in and if it starts to look a bit unbalanced, just cut them underneath.

. Everything else will crowd in over it and then the plants you chopped back may come up later on And then what's? The next stage after that Staking staking is very important.. I've learned from experience over many years.

Finally, the penny dropped that you really do need to stake things as early as you can, so some of our stakes actually stay in over the winter because it's very difficult. If I miss a moment in the spring, when you need to put your staking in, you may actually damage one of the plants underground.

If you do it too late, so some of them stay in.. I use any stakes. I can get my hands on really really good wrought iron types, which I was fortunate to buy. We were fortunate to buy years ago and they will go on forever and they morph in because they're sort of rusty they morph in and they're very, very strong.

. I wouldn't, go and buy thin wire stakes because they bend. Also a very friendly head gardener from a garden, not that far from here at Belmont, Graham said to go with hazel staking. So we've done some of that this year for the first time.

Put loads of stakes in we usually have so many stakes you wouldn't believe it, but it's. Never enough This year it's been particularly windy, and i & # 39. Ve had to sort of come up with a few inventions, lastminute.

com sort of thing with hazel, but thank goodness i did put enough in otherwise it would have been flattened. A few weeks ago. So have you got any other tips for anyone wanting a full beautiful border like this? If you want your long border to really last, you should start deadheading as soon as you can and deadhead the smallest flowers.

. If you can deadhead and be really patient, I deadhead really as soon as they start. Looking floppy I mean I've been deadheading. Now we're only in July, and i've, probably been deadheading for at least a month.

. Some of our my plants here have been planted fairly early because we were open for the National Garden Scheme last weekend, so i had to really think about aiming for that particular date for everything to be just right, and that meant getting things in quite early.

Taking a slight chance with some of the plants with late frost but as I grow and propagate most of most of our own plants, I had plenty in reserve., So yes, youmust, deadhead and also, although the plants get plenty of feed from the soil, the soil's been enriched with all the compost that you put on in the winter and in the spring I also do feed once or twice a week, just certain plants like the salvia'Black & amp, Blue'and the bergamots with Organic seaweed, liquid organic seaweed just to give them a bit of a boost, just a half feed half strength, but that at least once a week.

I decide on the extra boost with an extra feed just but because i deadhead regularly two or three times a day, and i look, i look at them and i just know you will know when your plants are looking slightly in need of something a little bit Extra because they they may just be struggling to put out another just another flower.

But if you study them and you love your plants, you'll know when they need a little bit extra and if you're, not too sure, then it's always best to give them a weak solution of feed. Best to under feed than overfeed, and then if they take to that quite kindly, then you could give them another half strength, feed in two or three days time and then you'll, see them pop up again or just look better.

They look more vibrant, something about them. You just recognize if you want a really full long border, try not to worry too much about colour scheme. If you live in a stately home and you had a lots of lovely spaces in the garden, then you can afford to do that.

I mean i used to try and do that. But actually, if you want a spectacularly beautiful border which is going to give you that wow factor, then don't worry too much about your color scheme. Just put it in, it was lovely being in the national garden scheme, because people were so complementary and i think genuinely so because it was such a whale factor when they came around the corner and it's because it's.

Everything you've, got to put in everything if you actually spread your color scheme out just shove. Everything in that you can basically you & # 39. Ve got healthy plants that are being well fed. Well, looked after, then.

Actually you'll have flowers and color for a long time, and then things will just gently just gently take over from another plant. How do you manage watering in a very full border like this when you have a dry summer or any of our summers here in the southeast? Another really very, very good tip is, if you know it's going to rain water your border beforehand, and i i select plants in the border that need watering.

I know when they need a bit of extra water, so i have a lovely, long wand on the end of my hose, which will reach certain plants. So i don't have to water the whole border. I'll, just water, certain plants make sure they have plenty, and then they're much happier, and i'd like to water early in the morning and also again in the evening.

If they look like, they need a bit of a top up, and the other thing is, if it's, if it has rained water the plants again, don't think that if your border has had a good dose of rain, even Three or four millimeters, even more than that, we've, had up to 10 millimeters water it again because then they will really love you.

They like a bit of water before and a bit of water. Afterwards, you can't go wrong. I'm, just going to remind everyone at this point that if you live in a wetter or more rainy part of the world, you & # 39.

Ll have to adapt your watering strategy accordingly. But the general point is a really interesting one, which is that if you have a very full border, that does mean it requires more water, and particularly some individual plants may require even more water than others.

So it's, something to bear in mind if you want this kind of a border, because i know many gardeners say that if a plant needs extra watering after its first couple of years, then it's, not the right plant for Their garden - and that is one gardening style, but this is a different gardening style, and this is a gardening style that goes for one full, wow factor border and that is going to require some extra watering at least of individual plants.

So have you got any more other tips? I spend a lot of time doing plants and trying to make the border look lovely. But if you have a lawn, the most important thing is that this border wouldn't, look anything if this lawn wasn't looking good, and that is absolutely true.

We've had years when the border has looked like this, and we lawn hasn't looked as good as it does. Today. The border still looks lovely, but it doesn't look spectacular and that's. A thing, so, if you have a lawn look after it make it green, keep your edges really sharp unless you particularly want them just to drift over, but it makes it makes life difficult for mowing uh.

But if you have that nice edges nice little bit of soil showing every now and again a green lawn, then your border will look good. This border looks as good as this from about may to october, with constantly changing flowers, and there are bulbs in it in spring.

Francis says there is one thing worth knowing, which is that it doesn't, look brilliant in the depths of winter. In early winter, you & # 39, ve got seed, heads and things like that, and those do look good but being realistic.

Those do gently collapse over the winter. I've now realized that i could do a lot more with feeding my garden. I'd, had some idea that i could overfeed my plants, but i'm, going to pile on lots. More manure and i'm, certainly going to try lots more deadheading and lots more staking.

So if you'd, like more tips, ideas and inspiration for your garden, then do subscribe to the middlesized garden youtube channel, and thank you for watching goodbye. Would you like people to come into your garden and go wow when they see your borders? I mean: do you think that herbaceous borders like these belong in grand country, houses with where there are teams of professional gardeners and a big budget for plants? This is paul and francis moskovitz's garden and it's 125 feet long by 65, feet wide that's about 38 by 19 meters and france, propagates most of the plants or grows them from seed herself, and she's, going to share her tips with us on how to get this kind of border.

That has an amazing wow factor. This isn't a low maintenance border. It's, a wow factor border and it's really important to recognize the difference between the two francis doesn't have any horticultural qualifications and the things that she does to look after this border.

Aren't difficult, but she does spend time and effort both thinking about it and doing things. I also talk quite often about finding your own gardening style, and this is a particular kind of gardening style, because if you love your garden and you love gardening, then giving a border extra care and attention so that you could have a real wow factor is often Very worthwhile i didn't, think i could ever achieve the levels of perfection seen in this border, but actually i've learned a lot from francis's tips and i think you will too she and paul run the Local garden club, which is called the painters, foster gardening club and they also open their garden twice a year for the national garden scheme and they visit other gardens, and i'll, put links for that in the description below so francis.

How have you created this border? Well, it's been years of sort of getting things together in my head, and i really wanted a beautiful mixed border. So it literally has taken years of practice with lots of propagation trying out different plants and probably, most importantly, getting a lot of inspiration from other gardens.

But my main inspiration has been great, dixter, absolutely love it, and when we get chance we we will try and nip along there once or twice a year, and then we come home and just have we're just inspired.

So that really has been the inspiration and for the last two or three years, maybe three or four years. Actually, we've sort of had the border more or less as we like it. It takes a lot of time, a lot of patience and a lot of manure that's, the most important thing, compost of all types, so a nice mix of compost, lovely range of plants and i love to mix the herbaceous perennials.

It's, actually quite easy now, because the herbaceous perennials obviously die away and then magically reappear, usually just after the spring bulbs, because we have a few spring bulbs in in the border.

And then we clear away all the detritus that's, sort of no longer really going to help the border and start to think about how the perennials are coming along. Then i i usually have done plenty of propagating.

I start to propagate things now for next year and then lots of sowing of seeds, annuals, biennials, obviously and then mix in whatever i've got um into the border and uh usually plenty of it. I, for me the secret is to put plenty in the border, so there's.

No weeding. Could you just run through how you do the compost? We get a mix of compost. We have a friendly farmer where we get some really lovely old, well-rotted cow manure - from an old cow yard which takes a bit of work because it's out on the marsh.

And we have to drive out there and take all our bags. And we fill it up and do several trips, but we get cow manure. We use organic horse, manure that's, usually been steam treated, so there are a few weeds in it and then mushroom compost and any old pots of compost go on there.

Just so that will help to keep the moisture in in the summer, but basically anything we can get our hands on and plenty of it. So how much compost do you put in the borders a foot two feet thick literally, so if i get a bag, a very, very heavy bag of our own collected compost, also, we have our own compost heap here and mixed in, but if we get a bag Of really well rotted steam treated horse, compost or anything like that, then one of those heavy really heavy bags will go on just one flox plant and i don't, spread it out.

It goes in a lump on top of it before it starts to come through the ground. In the autumn. I'll. Try and do it then, as well as in the spring and and then the birds during the winter will actually flatten it out.

Take all the bits out enjoy themselves on the food, and the worms will do the rest, and the thing is actually, there are great big lumps of compost, probably in there still, but you can't see it because it & # 39.

S actually covered in plants, so i think the thing to do is to be really heavy-handed on any organic material that you can get for the garden, any type of compost that suits your garden, and with this one we have a mix.

Because that way, i'm sort of covering all bases, but plenty of it. Don't skimp, don't think you have to put an inch or a six inch layer on or even a foot. If you can do fit, if you can get two two feet on there, shove it on and the other thing is we don't, do any digging.

We can't, possibly even begin to dig. Then we wouldn't dig this bed. We have a sort of no dig technique and it's, not nothing that we've sort of we've just had to do it because you can't find any space in there to dig so.

The worms do the digging for us. If you put enough compost on it's, really lovely very well rotted. You can even buy organic compost in bags. If you, if you haven & # 39, t got your own compost heap. If you can get anything put it on and don't, spread it out, don't, be alarmed put it on and then during the winter the bugs will be doing the work for you autumn.

I put plenty of compost on really load it up and again in the spring, and the thing is that very possibly by the time you get to the spring, you're, not quite sure, because the compost would have been probably morphed into the soil.

Sometimes you're, not quite sure where you & # 39. Ve put it literally, but don & # 39. T worry about that. Just put more on that's the secret, and how do you plant up the borders um? I would say always try and put more than one of your plants, for instance, if this year we've, we have bergamot, which has been in the border now for about two or three years, and i'm, never too sure whether Or not it's going to come through the winter.

I mean it always has some people say it's a short-lived plant, it hasn't been yet touched wood, so i always try and do plenty of cuttings. Just in case, and then, if i in the spring late spring, i will plant two or three more plants near to the bergamot that i'm.

Hoping is going to pop up. So in fact, you end up with this year, we & # 39. Ve ended up with quite a bit, and i love that. Yes, i would say make sure you put plenty of plants in if you have verbascums put a couple fairly close to each other.

They can, you know the perennial fabascums can get quite grand, but don't. Put that put you off because they flower forever and you can deadhead them and they keep flowering. So you don't space plants out the way they advise on the labels.

If it says, needs to be 12 inches apart. You you, wouldn't, necessarily take any notice of that. No, i don't have the spaces that they say on labels. I just make my own labels up, and i just put in whatever i can, wherever i can and don't be frightened because you can always cut them back if they start to get a little bit thuggish.

You know they're. Still going to be beautiful, they're, not taking over the garden, but they may unbalance the border in the colour scheme. Then you can always just chop them down a bit, then the other things will grow over them and then they & # 39.

Ll, come up later on a bit like a chelsea chop, but not quite a chelsea chop. You can sort of play with the border. It's a bit like a musical instrument. You can actually play with it and and it moves it's.

It's. Uh. A very easy way of getting lots of color in the garden is put lots in if it starts to look a bit unbalanced, just cut them underneath everything else. Everything else will crowd in and then those things will come up later on and then what's? The next stage after that staking staking is very important.

I've learned from experience over many years. Finally, the penny dropped that you really do need to stake things as early as you can. So some of our stakes actually stay in over the winter because it's very difficult.

If i miss a moment in the spring, when it's, vital that you need to put your staking in, you may actually damage one of the plants underground. So some of them stay in, but i use any steaks. I can get my hands on really really good wrought iron types, which i was fortunate to buy.

We were fortunate to buy years ago and they will go on forever and they morph into the cup because they're sort of rusty. They morph in, and they're very, very strong. They're, not the ones i wouldn't go and buy thin things because they bend also a very friendly head gardener from a garden, not that far from here at belmont, graham said to go with hazel staking.

So i've done some of that this year for the first time put loads of stakes in and then i usually have so many stakes you wouldn't believe it, but it's. Never enough so this year it's been particularly windy and i & # 39.

Ve had to sort of come up with a few inventions, lastminute.com sort of thing with hazel, but thank goodness i did put enough in otherwise it would have been flattened a few weeks ago. So have you got any more other tips for anyone wanting a full beautiful border like this? If you want your long border to really last, you should start deadheading as soon as you can and deadhead the smallest flowers.

If you can deadhead and be really patient, then i deadhead right really as soon as they start. Looking i mean i've been deadheading. Now we're. Only in july i've, probably been deadheading for at least a month cosmos i mean some of our my plants here have been.

I planted them fairly early because we were in the ngs this weekend in july, so i had to really think about july, the 11th and 12th. So i was aiming for the 11th and 12th for everything to be just right and that meant getting things in quite early, taking a slight chance with some of the plants with late frost, but i actually grow and propagate most of most of my own plants.

So i had plenty in reserve, so yes must deadhead and also, although the plants get plenty of feed from the soil that they've been sort of enriched with the soil's been enriched with all the compost that you put on In the winter and in the spring, i also do feed once or twice a week plants in the garden.

Certain plants like the um, the salvia black and blue and the bergamots with organic seaweed, liquid organic seaweed just to give them a bit of a boost. Just a half feed half strength but that at least once a week i decide on the extra boost with an extra feed just but because i deadhead regularly two or three times a day, and i look, i look at them and i just know you will know When your plants are looking slightly in need of something a little bit extra because they, they may just be struggling to put out another just another flower.

But if you study them and you love your plants, you'll know when they need a little bit extra and if you're, not too sure, then it's always best to give them a weak solution of feed. Best to under feed than overfeed, and then if they take to that quite kindly, then you could give them another half strength, feed in two or three days time and then you'll, see them pop up again or just look better.

They look more vibrant, something about them. You just recognize if you want a really full long border, try not to worry too much about colour scheme. If you live in a stately home and you had a lots of lovely spaces in the garden, then you can afford to do that.

I mean i used to try and do that. But actually, if you want a spectacularly beautiful border which is going to give you that wow factor, then don't worry too much about your color scheme. Just put it in, it was lovely being in the national garden scheme, because people were so complementary and i think genuinely so because it was such a whale factor when they came around the corner and it's because it's.

Everything you've, got to put in everything if you actually spread your color scheme out just shove. Everything in that you can basically you & # 39. Ve got healthy plants that are being well fed. Well, looked after, then.

Actually you'll have flowers and color for a long time, and then things will just gently just gently take over from another plant. How do you manage watering in a very full border like this when you have a dry summer or any of our summers here in the southeast? Another really very, very good tip is, if you know it's going to rain water your border beforehand, and i i select plants in the border that need watering.

I know when they need a bit of extra water, so i have a lovely, long wand on the end of my hose, which will reach certain plants. So i don't have to water the whole border. I'll, just water, certain plants make sure they have plenty, and then they're much happier, and i'd like to water early in the morning and also again in the evening.

If they look like, they need a bit of a top up, and the other thing is, if it's, if it has rained water the plants again, don't think that if your border has had a good dose of rain, even Three or four millimeters, even more than that, we've, had up to 10 millimeters water it again because then they will really love you.

They like a bit of water before and a bit of water. Afterwards, you can't go wrong. I'm, just going to remind everyone at this point that if you live in a wetter or more rainy part of the world, you & # 39.

Ll have to adapt your watering strategy accordingly. But the general point is a really interesting one, which is that if you have a very full border, that does mean it requires more water, and particularly some individual plants may require even more water than others.

So it's, something to bear in mind if you want this kind of a border, because i know many gardeners say that if a plant needs extra watering after its first couple of years, then it's, not the right plant for Their garden - and that is one gardening style, but this is a different gardening style, and this is a gardening style that goes for one full, wow factor border and that is going to require some extra watering at least of individual plants.

So have you got any more other tips? I spend a lot of time doing plants and trying to make the border look lovely. But if you have a lawn, the most important thing is that this border wouldn't, look anything if this lawn wasn't looking good, and that is absolutely true.

We've had years when the border has looked like this, and we lawn hasn't looked as good as it does. Today. The border still looks lovely, but it doesn't look spectacular and that's. A thing, so, if you have a lawn look after it make it green, keep your edges really sharp unless you particularly want them just to drift over, but it makes it makes life difficult for mowing uh.

But if you have that nice edges nice little bit of soil showing every now and again a green lawn, then your border will look good. This border looks as good as this from about may to october, with constantly changing flowers, and there are bulbs in it in spring.

Francis says there is one thing worth knowing, which is that it doesn't, look brilliant in the depths of winter. In early winter, you & # 39, ve got seed, heads and things like that, and those do look good but being realistic.

Those do gently collapse over the winter. I've now realized that i could do a lot more with feeding my garden. I'd, had some idea that i could overfeed my plants, but i'm, going to pile on lots. More manure and i'm, certainly going to try lots more deadheading and lots more staking.

So if you'd, like more tips, ideas and inspiration for your garden, then do subscribe to the middlesized garden youtube channel and thank you for watching goodbye.

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