It's, the midsummer garden tour. So I thought I'd, show you the garden at midsummer and also go through some of the garden jobs that we need to do over the next month.. It's Alexandra here from the Middlesized Garden, YouTube channel and blog it's, not just mid summer.

It's, also sunrise. The very very best time to take photographs of your garden or to film is in the hour. After sunrise or the hour before sunset, so I try to get up just after sunrise, so that I can photograph the garden in the best possible light and of course midsummer is the earliest time.

I need to get up. It's 4:40 in in the morning, and so it's a bit of a celebration. I'm, not going to have to get up any earlier and from now on it will be a little bit later.. So just to explain to you what the middle sized garden is like.

It is a town garden. It's. A walled town garden in southeast England., I think you'd, call it approximately a zone 9 or possibly an 8a, because it doesn't get very cold in the winter, but in the summer it has increasingly been getting quite warm for The last month, or so we regularly had temperatures of about 25 degrees Celsius and about sort of 80/, 85 Fahrenheit, and I know that my sister-in-law in Australia would find it most amusing to call this hot.

But it does feel hot to us and it's also been very dry.. We seem to be getting some very dry summers, so the main garden job that we have to do is watering. With watering I don't water, the whole garden.

I don't water plants, shrubs and trees that are well-established, because if they & # 39, ve got their roots down. They should be able to get enough water from the soil and if they can't, I think they're, probably not the right kind of plant or shrub for my garden, but pots need watering because obviously they can & # 39.

T hold that much water and vegetables are very, very thirsty, so vegetables need watering every single day., But the area in which some people would disagree with me about is I don't water, my lawn -the Royal Horticultural Society and the government and the Water services all say'don't use a sprinkler on your lawn in dry spells'because the lawn will go brown, but it will bounce back.

. The other thing we're doing with the lawn at the moment is we're, not mowing it as often, and we're, not cutting it as short. Once again, this is partly about the very dry weather. If it's very dry, your lawn will be better if it's not too short, and it's not mown too often, and of course it won't grow that fast either, but I've also been talking to Jane Moore, who is the head gardener at the Bath Priory hotel and who has just written a book called Planting for Butterflies.

And butterflies like bees and other pollinators are at danger of extinction. Some of them are dying out and we are seeing fewer and fewer butterflies in our garden and butterflies. Aren't just gorgeous to look at, but they are also a very good indicator on whether you & # 39.

Ve got a healthy ecosystem in your garden. And as well as planting specific plants for butterflies. Jane also said that actually keeping your lawn not tightly mown is very good for butterflies and other pollinators.

. Now this isn't about having a complete meadow lawn. This is just about keeping the mower blades a little bit higher and not mowing quite so often so that flowers like clover and daisies and buttercups can flower beneath the mower blades.

And so you will still get the impression of a standard lawn.. A nectar, lawn won't, look as green, it wont be beautifully striped and it will have patches of daisies in in it.. I'm, taking this literally 24 hours later than the last shot you saw of the lawn and that's because an hour after I stopped filming yesterday, there was a torrential downpour and I just thought it'd.

Be interesting to see how quickly the lawn has greened up and this whole business of whether you have a nectar lawn or a neatly, mowed lawn, whether you treat your lawn or you don't is so much a question of personal taste.

Certainly not mowing so often is less work and leaving the blades a little bit higher means that flowers that support pollinators can bloom under the blades as it were, but it's not for everyone, and I talk quite a lot about developing your own Gardening style - and I think that this is just a something for you to think about and to see which kind of a lawn you'd like.

One of the biggest jobs at midsummer and probably for about a couple of months afterwards, is weeding, and It's, the perennial weeds that really get me at this time of the year. If you look at this bed, you'd.

Think I never weed, but I promise you I do, but if it's absolutely rife with bindweed and I & # 39. Ve got the ground elder problem in the front garden as well.. So as well as watering and weeding. There is also feeding roses -that's very important at midsummer and lots of people do forget.

The midsummer rose feed.. We have some Bonica roses in our front garden and they're, looking really pretty at the moment, but they are very much less than they were about five years ago-. They used to be really abundant and they're, not quite so abundant now and there's.

Possibly several reasons for this, and one is that they may be just getting old.. I know these are at least thirty years old. They were here when we moved in the other is that they may not be getting enough nutrition.

I have let a patch of ground elder get far too well-established around their roots and although I had been digging that out quite carefully recently, I think the ground elder may have been taking nutrients from the roses.

But also I under planted with some Nepeta & # 39, Six Hills, Giant'a couple of years ago, and the roses haven't been as good since then, and when I interviewed Michael Marriott of David Austin roses back in February.

He said that actually there were some plants that you shouldn't plant too close to roses and that the Nepeta & # 39. Six Hills, Giant'was one of them, although I know that a lot of garden designers do use it.

As a combination - because it looks so pretty anyway - I've pulled up most of my Nepeta and I think I will pull out the rest and as far as the weeds are concerned, I've done a big clearing of the ground And I have laid down cardboard and then I have put a layer of garden manure.

On top of that, and I'm, hoping that the cardboard will at least mean that the weeds don't come through quite so much. But I can tell you they are popping up like mad every day.. I have one main border.

You can see it behind me, which is where I do all the major gardening. The alliums are over. But I keep the heads on because I think they are so lovely and wonderfully sculptural. The irises are also over, but those heads need to come off and you need to cut the whole stalk off, and the other thing is is that where irises have clumped up, you need to dig them up and divide them.

4-6 weeks after flowering - and I interviewed Iris of Sissinghurst about how to choose and care for irises and that video is in the description below as well, and this is another job I will have to do in the next week or so to dig up my irises To divide them up and to replant them.

, Once you've, dug up your irises, you can quite literally just pull them apart. Each piece needs to have some roots on it, so you need some some rhizome some root and some leaf, and in order to stop windrock, you need to cut the leaves across leaving some greenery on because they need to feed the roots.

When you replant it. This top of the rhizome needs to be able to get the sun because it's. The sun baking on here that will make your flowers for next year. And meanwhile, these roots are buried in the earth.

So it's. A very shallow planting.: This is the garden seen from the back door of the house and, as you can see, we have a terrace and we have a pop-up gazebo, which we put up in the summer to give us a little bit of an extra room.

You're, not meant to leave pop up gazebos up for the whole summer and obviously we take it down when it's windy, but otherwise it sort of seems alright, leaving it up. And now I'll. Take you to see the wildlife pond now.

This is wildlife. Pond I made from an oak barrel and there's, a video about how to do that in the description below. But if you have a small wildlife pond, it is important to keep it topped up with water during a dry spell.

So I've, been doing that and of course tap water is not great for it, so I have a water butt. I use for the pond water, but also, if you put water into a watering, can and let it sit for a couple of days the chemicals evaporate off.

. Then you can see the pots which has turned into a sort of a foliage story. This is begonia'Scharfii & # 39, a swiss cheese plant, and this is a very, very pretty plant. It's. Hydrangea, Miss Saori with lovely dark leaves here we have a trough with some eucalyptus which a friend of mine used in her winter window boxes, and we did a video on that and that's in the description below.

But she's. Just cleared the window boxes out, and so I'm going to use these. Down here. You have rosemary, so it's, nice and close to the kitchen. This is some self seeded alchemilla mollis and over here we have mint and coleus.

. Now the roses here are almost over these roses. I thought they were called Cecile Brunner, but actually a friend said she thinks they're, probably called'Little Pet'and they are fantastic because they come out around this time.

Of year - and they will be like this for about two or three weeks and then I'll chop them back with shears, and then we & # 39. Ll, get a second flush, usually around four weeks later and then walking along.

We'll, now go up the steps and go into what I call the parterre and, of course, very, very pleased to see that the lavender is back this year, -we cut it with a strimmer last August, -we cut it back very hard.

I was a bit worried, but that might not be a good idea, but actually I think you can see it's, really a very, very happy lavender. There's. One thing I'd like to ask you -would, you like to know more wildlife, friendly and environmentally friendly tips in the garden videos, so that you can use them in your own garden.

Do let me know in the comments below and if you'd, like more tips, ideas and inspiration for your garden then do subscribe to the Middlesized Garden YouTube channel and thank you for watching good bye.

. It's, the midsummer Garden, her. So I thought I'd, show you the garden at midsummer and also go through some of the garden jobs that we need to do over the next month. It's Alexander here from the little size, garden, YouTube channel and blog.

It's, not just mid summer. It's also summarize the very very best time to take photographs of your garden or to film. It is in the hour, after sunrise or the hour before sunset, so I try to get up just after sunrise, so that I can photograph the garden in the best possible light.

And of course, midsummer is the earliest time. If I & # 39, ll need to get up it's 4:40 in in the morning, and so it's. A bit of a celebration. I'm, not going to have to get up any earlier and from now on it will be a little bit later.

So just to explain to you what the middle sized garden is like. It is a town garden. It's. A walled town garden in southeast England, I think you'd, call it approximately a zone 9 or possibly an 8 a because it doesn't get very cold in the winter, but in the summer it has increasingly been getting quite warm For the last month, or so, we regularly had temperatures of about 25 degrees Celsius and about sort of 80, 85 Fahrenheit, and I know that my sister-in-law in Australia would find this most amusing to call this hot.

But it does feel hot to us and it's also been very dry. We seem to be getting some very dry summers, so the main garden job that we have to do is watering with watering I don't water. The whole gardener I don't water plants, shrubs and trees that are well-established, because if they & # 39, ve got their roots down.

They should be able to get enough water from the soil and if they can't, I think they're, probably not the right kind of plant or shrub for my garden, but pots need watering because obviously they can & # 39.

T hold that much water and vegetables are very, very thirsty, so vegetables need watering every single day, but the area in which some people would disagree with me about is I don't water, my lawn the world, horticultural society and the government and the Water services all say don't use a sprinkler on your lawn in dry spells because the lawn will go Brown and it will bounce back.

The other thing we're doing with the lawn at the moment is we're, not mowing it as often, and we're, not wearing it as short, and once again, this is partly about the very dry weather. If it's very dry, your lawn will be better if it's not too short, and it's not known too often, and of course it won't grow that fast either.

But I've also been talking to Jane Moore, who is the head gardener at Bart Priory hotel and who has just written a book called planting for butterflies and butterflies like bees and other pollinators are at danger of extinction.

Some of them are dying out and we are seeing fewer and fewer butterflies in our garden and butterflies. Aren't just gorgeous to look at, but they are also a very good indicator on whether you & # 39. Ve got a healthy ecosystem in your garden and as well as planting specific plants for butterflies.

Jane also said that actually, keeping your lawn not tightly mode is very good for butterflies and other pollinators. Now this isn't about having a complete medal, or this is just about keeping the mower blades a little bit higher so that I'm, not knowing quite so often so that flowers like clover and daisies and buttercups can flower beneath The mower blades, and so you will still get the impression of a standard lawn, a nectar, lawn won't, look as green, it went beautifully stripes and it will have patches of daisies in Cobra in it.

I'm. Taking this literally 24 hours later than the last shot, you saw the lawn and that's, because an hour after I stopped filming yesterday, there was a torrential downpour and I just thought it'd, be interesting to see how quickly the Lawn has greened up and this whole business of whether you have a nectar, lon or a neatly mowed lawn, whether you treat your lawn or you, don't is so much a question of personal taste.

Certainly not knowing so often is less work and leaving the blades a little bit higher means that flowers that support pollinators can bloom under the blades as it were, but it's not for everyone, and I talked quite a lot about developing your own Gardening style - and I think that this is just a something for you to think about and to see which kind of a lawn you'd, like one of the biggest jobs at midsummer and probably in about a couple of months afterwards, is weeding, and It's, the perennial weeds that really get me at this time of the year.

If you look at this bed, you'd. Think I never we did. I promise you I do, but if he's, absolutely rife with bindweed and I & # 39. Ve got the grounder the problem in the front garden as well. So as well as watering and weeding.

There is also feeding roses. That's very important at midsummer and lots of people do forget. The midsummer Rose feed. We have some Bonica roses in our front garden and they're, looking really pretty at the moment, but they are very much less than they were about five years ago.

They used to be really abundant and they're, not quite so abundant now and there's. Possibly several reasons for this, and one is that they may be just getting old. I know these are at least thirty years old.

They were here when we moved in the other is that they may not be getting enough nutrition. I have let a patch of ground elder get far too well-established around their roots and although I had been digging that out quite carefully recently, I think the ground elder may have been taking nutrients from the roses, but also I under planted with some new Peter six Hills giant a couple of years ago and the roses haven't been as good since then, and when I interviewed Michael Merritt of David Austin roses back in February.

He said that actually there were some plants that you shouldn't plant too close to roses and that the Peter six Phil's giant was one of them, although I know that a lot of garden designers do use it. As a combination - because it looks so pretty anyway - I've pulled up most of my new Peter six Hills down, and I think I will pull out the rest and as far as the weeds are concerned, I've done a big Clearing of the ground over and I have laid down cardboard and then I have put a layer of garden manure.

On top of that, and I'm, hoping that the cardboard will at least mean that the weeds don't come through. Quite so much, but I can tell you they are popping up like mad every day I have one main border.

You can see it behind me, which is where I do all the major gardening the aliens are over. But I keep the heads on because I think they are so lovely and wonderfully sculptural. The irises are also over, but those head to come off and you need to cut the whole stalk off, and the other thing is is that where irises have clumped up, you need to dig them up and divide them in July, and I interviewed iris assessing her Stall about how to choose and care for irises and that videos in the description below as well.

But this is another job I will have to do in the next week or so, which is to dig up my irises to divide them up and to replant them. Once you've dug up your irises, you can quite literally just pull them apart.

Each piece needs to have some roots on it, so you need some some rhizome some root and some leaf, and in order to stop Windrock, you need to cut the leaves across leaving some greenery on because they need to feed the roots when you replant it.

This top of the rhizome needs to be able to get the Sun because it's. The Sun baking on here that will make your flowers for next year I mean, while these roots were buried in the earth, so it's. A very shallow planting: this is the garden seen from the back door of a house and, as you can see, we have a terrace and we have a pop-up gazebo, which we put up in the summer to give us a little bit of an extra room.

You're, not mentally prop zebras up for the whole summer and obviously we take it down when it's very windy, but otherwise it sort of seems a clear leaving it up and just take you to see the wildlife pond now.

This is a wildlife pond I made from an oak barrel and there's, a video about how to do that in the description below. But if you have a small wildlife pond, it is important to keep it topped up with water during a drought.

So I've, been doing that and of course tap water is not great for it, so I have a water button. I used water but water for many ponds, but also, if you put water into a watering, can and let it sit for a couple of days - the chemicals from the bath right off, then you can see the pots which has turned into a sort of a huge Story is begonia coffee, i swiss cheese plant and this is a very, very pretty plant.

It's. Hydrangea, miss Surrey with lovely black leaves here we have a trough with some eucalyptus which a friend of mine used in her winter window boxes, and we did a video on that and that's in the description below.

But she's. Just cleared the window boxes out, and so I'm going to use these down here. You have Rosalie, so it's, nice and close to the kitchen. This is some self seeded, alchemy Romanus, and over here we have mint and coleus.

Now roses here are almost over these roses. I thought they were called Cecile Brunner, but actually a friend said she thinks they're, probably called little pet and they are fantastic because they come out around this time of year, and they will be like this for about two or three weeks and Then I'll chop them back with shears, and then we'll, get a second flush, usually around August or September, and then walking along yeah well now go up the steps and go into what I call the parterre and of course, Very very pleased to see that the lavender is back this year.

We cut it with a strimmer. Last August. We cut it back very hard. I was a bit worried, but that might not be a good idea, but actually I think you can see it's, really a very, very happy lavender, but there's.

One thing I'd like to ask you: would you like to know more wildlife, friendly and environmentally friendly tips in the garden videos, so that you can use them in your own garden? Dee? Let me know in the comments below and if you'd, like more tips, ideas, inspiration for your garden, then do subscribe to the middle size, garden YouTube channel and thank you for watching good, bye.

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